Glossary of newspaper terminology

Collectively they may also be known as wraps, round-ups or news belts. Agate : Small type (usually 5. Special radio receivers are required. Guerrilla marketing: A relatively low cost marketing technique which uses surprise or shock to promote a product or service, especially one which interrupts a consumer to pay special attention. This technique is frequently overused, but when used properly it adds immeasurably to a story. At the end of the SOT, the reporter or anchor resumes reading with or without additional video. Justification: Where each line in a column of text aligns to the same left and right margins. Human interest story: A news story or feature which focuses on individual people and the effects of issues or events on them. 8 grammes per square metre.

(2) A small headline in different type above and slightly to the left of the main headline. Used in quotes to denote the words between them have been modified from or added to the original, usually for greater clarity, e.             Wrap/live – basically the same as the wrap in that the information is collected and written the same. Kicker: (1) The first sentence or first few words of a story’s intro, set in a larger font size than the body text. Loaded words or loaded questions: Words which, in some contexts, contain strong value judgments and which indicate the user’s position on an issue. The Times-News Newspaper in Education program provides print and electronic replica. In broadcasting, headlines are short summaries of a few important stories that will follow in full in the bulletin. City Hall)   , I’M LENA SMITH FOR THE NEWS AT FIVE-FIFTY,” in that order. Human interest stories are often used to make ideas more real and concrete in the minds of the viewer, reader or listener. Square brackets: Also called ‘box brackets’. Television news gathering which replaced film couriered back to the newsroom with electronic methods such as video and microwave links to the studio.

Stet: Latin for ‘let it stand’, a mark – the word ‘stet’ in a circle – used by sub-editors and proof readers telling the typesetter to disregard a change that had been previously marked. Unjustified: Text in columns where the individual lines to not all align to the same left or right margin. Video podcasts are often called vodcasts.   Primarily used for setting a mood or providing atmosphere for a report. Here’s a glossary of magazine and newspaper layout terms – taken from a variety of sources. Futures calendar Date book in which story ideas, meetings and activities. Banner a large type headline running across a newspaper page. Agate : Small type (usually 5. Headline or head: A word or short phrase in large type at the top of an article designed to either summarise the news or grab the reader’s attention and make them want to read it. Voicer – A recorded in-studio report that contains no sound bites. Hits counts the number of downloads of every element of a web page, not the page as a whole. Professional journalists are usually trained and receive payment for their work. First compiled at the start of the newsroom’s day, items may be added or taken away during the day.             Package (PKG) – A report from a correspondent that contains a sound bite inserted between the introduction and the epilogue (usually inserted after the reporter’s second or third sentence). IDs are usually composed around specific melodies, themes or slogans and made available to presenters in a variety of styles and lengths to suit different purposes in programming. Where there is only a single camera, noddies are usually shot after the interview ends and then edited into the finished piece to break up long slabs of the interviewee.

Often used to name and describe the person speaking. Typically, whole programs are dedicated to this single function and the names of people who pledge money are read out on air. The copy editor ensures the text flows, makes sense, is fair and accurate, and poses no legal problems. They ‘float’ over the presenter’s voice to illustrate aspects of what the presenter or guest is talking about. See also stock footage. Also used to describe unusual methods which actually do not look like advertising to the consumer. Enter search term or. Glossary of business terms – A to Z Handy definitions of financial and economic jargon – from libor and quantitave easing to black swans and dead cat bounces. Television news gathering which replaced film couriered back to the newsroom with electronic methods such as video and microwave links to the studio. Float: Pictures or vision shown on television while the presenter is talking or interviewing a guest.

Flag: Name of newspaper, as it is printed on the front page. Editor: (1) The person – usually a journalist – in charge of the editorial content and direction of a newspaper, magazine or other news outlet. Citizen journalism: Journalism outside the established media, usually by ordinary citizens without professional training or organisational experience. Human interest story: A news story or feature which focuses on individual people and the effects of issues or events on them. Newspaper Terminology; NIE Teacher Services; Teacher's Lesson Exchange; ORDER. Also called an outcue. (3) An Australian name for talk radio.

Caption
the descriptive line or lines accompanying an illustration or photograph Copy
traditionally the manuscript prepared for typesetting, but in the age of desk top publishing systems, the story or text on a wordprocessing screen ready for placing on the newspaper page Crosshead
see subhead Cut-off
the full column depth of a page, including the margins.             Voiceover-to-sound( VO/SOT) – A TV news story during which a news anchor or reporter reads a script live as video is played up to a place when a news maker video/audio sound bite is played.

            Running Time – Refers either to the estimated time or the actual time of a newscast. Guerrilla marketing: A relatively low cost marketing technique which uses surprise or shock to promote a product or service, especially one which interrupts a consumer to pay special attention. (2) A person in charge of a special section of news output, e. Glossary of language education terms Language teaching, like other educational activities, may employ specialized vocabulary and word use. In printing, an illustration at the end of a chapter. Enter search term or. Delay: Equipment in a radio studio which stores seven seconds of program in memory before sending it to the transmitter. Digital radio broadcasting (DRB): Also called digital audio broadcasting (DAB), a method of transmitting radio signals in data streams giving a much higher quality than the old analogue system and allowing more programming channels within the same amount of spectrum.

These can be included in PKGs and VO/SOTs or can stand alone. (3) A few words at the beginning of a caption to grab the reader’s attention. Also called participatory journalism and networked journalism. Even perceived conflicts of interest should be declared openly.   A good beat check would be comprised of the sheriff’s offices, fire department, local police, state highway patrol, DNR , local hospitals, and other government agencies that routinely handle breaking stories.

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The Prime Minister said: ‘We will not tolerate weapons [from Russia] to cross our borders. On television, these are called telethons. Short for 'newspaper billboard'. (1) Raw footage is the original sound and vision of a television report before being edited or additional sounds, captions etc are added. Papers often had Stop Press boxes in a corner of the front or back page where brief urgent stories could be inserted. Occasionally also used to describe normal radio broadcasts which are free to listeners with conventional radio receivers.             Voiceover-to-sound( VO/SOT) – A TV news story during which a news anchor or reporter reads a script live as video is played up to a place when a news maker video/audio sound bite is played. Banner a large type headline running across a newspaper page. Once downloaded onto a computer, podcasts can be transferred to portable devices such as the Apple iPod or similar MP3 players. Skyline this is an information panel on the front page that tells.

Formal statement of newspaper’s name, officers, place of publication and other descriptive information, usually on the editorial page. Newspaper terminology Masthead/title piece the newspaper’s title displayed on the front page. Log: A record of events. Also called greenscreen, bluescreen or Colour Separation Overlay (CSO). At the end of the SOT, the reporter or anchor resumes reading with or without additional video. Features which are not strongly connected to hard news events are often called soft features.

Satellite television: Television services delivered through satellites, received on the ground by satellite dishes and decoders. Longer features may be called documentaries. Box an item or story ruled off on all four sides, usually with. The outcue for this is always “At (i. Language, grammar, and literary terms. The Times-News Newspaper in Education program provides print and electronic replica. Podcast: Audio or video files that can be regularly or automatically downloaded from the website of their producer onto the computers of people who subscribe to receive them. Similar to actuality in radio except the person can be seen. A package will contain a written introduction for the newsreader, the reporter’s edited report complete with vision and sound and an out-cue for the end. Also called participatory journalism and networked journalism. G a film, radio show, newspaper. Subhead
(or Crosshead), a sub-heading within the text of a story or article, often used to break columns of type and make the page more attractive or easy on the eye. House style: An organisation’s set of rules for how language and other elements are used, usually contained in a style guide available to all editorial staff. (2) Two-way intercom equipment by which a radio or television presenter or newsreader in a studio can communicate with producers or directors in a control room. Defamatory comments), the presenter can press a dump button which effectively deletes the preceding seven seconds and returns the program to real time transmission.

Professional journalists are usually trained and receive payment for their work. Subhead
(or Crosshead), a sub-heading within the text of a story or article, often used to break columns of type and make the page more attractive or easy on the eye. Compare with hard news. (2) Raw feed is this footage transmitted from location to the base studio or to other television stations, where it will be processed. English Language Terminology: High.   Correct term is title piece. For example, having shares in a company could make a finance reporter say uncritically good things to boost that company. RSS: Rich Site Summary (also called Really Simple Syndication) are formats for delivering regularly updated web content provided by news sites, blogs, audio, video and other online publishers. Its grammage makes a huge difference in the cost of publication with many pages. He said: ‘She gone [sic] to see her mother. House style: An organisation’s set of rules for how language and other elements are used, usually contained in a style guide available to all editorial staff. When reporters are gathered together to question someone in the news, usually taking it in turns to ask questions. Page views are a more reliable measure of web traffic. Similar to a shotlist.

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Delay: Equipment in a radio studio which stores seven seconds of program in memory before sending it to the transmitter. Digital broadcasting: An advanced system of broadcasting radio (DAB or DRB) or television (DTV) in digital pulses rather than waves and which gives improved quality and/or more channels of content. Papers often had Stop Press boxes in a corner of the front or back page where brief urgent stories could be inserted. 9/8/2012 · A-Level English Glossary. Used in quotes to denote the words between them have been modified from or added to the original, usually for greater clarity, e.

11 Responses to Glossary of Media Terminology. (1) The final words or pictures on a radio or TV report or interview, noted to the director or presenter so they know that segment is finished. Also called participatory journalism and networked journalism. Often several SOT can be spliced together with the edits cover with video. Occasionally also used to describe normal radio broadcasts which are free to listeners with conventional radio receivers. Advocacy journalism: A type of journalism in which journalists openly and intentionally takes sides on issues and express their opinions in reporting.

Banner a large type headline running across a newspaper page. Compare to professional journalists.   Substantial savings can be made on handling, storage and distribution as well as original paper costs by using a lighter weight and of course lighter weights require less raw materials. The copy editor ensures the text flows, makes sense, is fair and accurate, and poses no legal problems. Hits:  A popular but misleading method of counting viewing of websites. Also the line at the top of the continued article stating the page from which it was continued, also called a ‘from’ line. Also used to describe a newspaper style that uses short, simply-written stories and headlines with lots of pictures to illustrate more sensational content.

(where a professional writer writes a book or a newspaper article. Subtitles: A text version of the words spoken in a television program or movie, displayed at the bottom of the screen as the relevant words are spoken. The outcue for this is always “At (i. Glossary of Broadcasting/Broadcast News Terms. (2) An adjective describing issues relating to news content as opposed to advertising or other non-news aspects of a newspaper or magazine.   Quality national newspapers are broadsheet in size By-Line
the name of the writer.

Newspaper terminology Masthead/title piece the newspaper’s title displayed on the front page

In some countries, limited radio services are also delivered via satellite. Here’s a glossary of magazine and newspaper layout terms – taken from a variety of sources. In broadcasting, headlines are short summaries of a few important stories that will follow in full in the bulletin. Stet: Latin for ‘let it stand’, a mark – the word ‘stet’ in a circle – used by sub-editors and proof readers telling the typesetter to disregard a change that had been previously marked. Editorial: (1) An article written by, or on behalf of, an editor, giving the news organisation’s opinion on an issue. Wrap – aka Wraparound (or in television lingo, a Package) – A report from a correspondent that contains an actuality(s) inserted between the introduction and the epilogue (usually inserted after the reporter’s second or third sentence).

Hits:  A popular but misleading method of counting viewing of websites

Convergence: The bringing together of different media technologies such as radio, print, video and the Internet so they work together to improve communications. Propaganda: Information presented intentionally to influence a mass audience to support or oppose something. Sometimes called fully justified or set full. The following glossary contains more than 500 definitions of terms about journalism and the media – including new media. Flag: Name of newspaper, as it is printed on the front page. (3) An Australian name for talk radio.

An example would be coverage of a demonstration at City Hall where people are loudly protesting. Headline or head: A word or short phrase in large type at the top of an article designed to either summarise the news or grab the reader’s attention and make them want to read it. Futures calendar Date book in which story ideas, meetings and activities. (2) Also called a signature line, information about the author appended to the bottom of an email or blog. Papers often had Stop Press boxes in a corner of the front or back page where brief urgent stories could be inserted. Propaganda is usually motivated by self interest and can range from being selective in what it chooses to highlight or ignore to actively lying about events and issues. Also the line at the top of the continued article stating the page from which it was continued, also called a ‘from’ line.

A station ident may contain the station’s name and frequency, often accompanied by a musical jingle. Skyline this is an information panel on the front page that tells the. (2) An adjective describing issues relating to news content as opposed to advertising or other non-news aspects of a newspaper or magazine. Convergence: The bringing together of different media technologies such as radio, print, video and the Internet so they work together to improve communications. Jump line: A line of type at the bottom of an incomplete newspaper or magazine article which directs the reader to another page where the story is continued. Futures calendar Date book in which story ideas, meetings and activities.

            Beat Checks – Using a telephone to search for and tape news stories from a list of agencies

Caption
the descriptive line or lines accompanying an illustration or photograph Copy
traditionally the manuscript prepared for typesetting, but in the age of desk top publishing systems, the story or text on a wordprocessing screen ready for placing on the newspaper page Crosshead
see subhead Cut-off
the full column depth of a page, including the margins. The outcue for this is always “At (i. (2) Raw feed is this footage transmitted from location to the base studio or to other television stations, where it will be processed. This glossary of newspaper terms was developed to increase the understanding of the terms and acronyms that may be unique to the newspaper industry. Caption: In print, short pieces of text placed below or beside pictures to describe them and identify the photographers and/or owners. Headline or head: A word or short phrase in large type at the top of an article designed to either summarise the news or grab the reader’s attention and make them want to read it.

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