Glossary of newspaper terms

This is achieved by stretching or shrinking the width of letters or spaces between words. (3) An abbreviation of out-take, see below. When reporters are gathered together to question someone in the news, usually taking it in turns to ask questions. It may contain written documents, photographs, charts, schedules and other information the organisation wants journalists to focus on. The confusion exists because not every publication has a masthead, and in some publications, the role of the masthead and the flag are fulfilled by the same element. (2) Also called a signature line, information about the author appended to the bottom of an email or blog. Actuality: In radio, the sound of something actually happening, people speaking etc. See our Privacy Policy and User Agreement for details.             Voiceover-to-sound( VO/SOT) – A TV news story during which a news anchor or reporter reads a script live as video is played up to a place when a news maker video/audio sound bite is played.

Glossary of Broadcasting/Broadcast News Terms. Human interest stories are often used to make ideas more real and concrete in the minds of the viewer, reader or listener. Video podcasts are often called vodcasts. Propaganda is usually motivated by self interest and can range from being selective in what it chooses to highlight or ignore to actively lying about events and issues. It can also describe other factors such as local content, sports coverage, talkback etc. (2) An abrupt ending. In broadcasting, they may either be a brief insert into other programming or be presented as a block of short stories within a bulletin. Longer features may be called documentaries. 8 grammes per square metre. An example would be coverage of a demonstration at City Hall where people are loudly protesting. The following glossary contains more than 500 definitions of terms about journalism and.

(2) A person in charge of a special section of news output, e. The Times-News Newspaper in Education program provides print and electronic replica editions (e-editions) of the newspaper at a reduced rate for use in Alamance County (N. The headline is printed in large-type and is the title or summary of the main news story for that day. An example would be coverage of a demonstration at City Hall where people are loudly protesting. (2) Information on advertising and other service costs made available by media companies to potential advertisers.   A crosshead is centred in the column, a subhead usually set left. Longer features may be called documentaries. The Prime Minister said: ‘We will not tolerate weapons [from Russia] to cross our borders. Spelling and punctuation of terms occasionally vary. When reporters are gathered together to question someone in the news, usually taking it in turns to ask questions. The weight of newsprint is calculated in grammes per square metre, most of it weighing between 45 and 48. Some stations have a mainly news and current affairs format, others may have a mainly music format or a news/talk format.   Producers/editors should always estimate the running time of the newscast based on the actual time of each recorded  report and her or his best guess as to the time of each intro and each story to be read by the anchor. Sometimes called a sound bite. This glossary of newspaper terms was developed to increase the. See our User Agreement and Privacy Policy.

Compare with pay TV or subscription radio. File footage: Segments of video or film footage kept in tape libraries – or on newsroom computer archives – to illustrate either (1) general events such as crowds shopping or aeroplanes taxiing at airports or (2) past events used in current stories. Occasionally also used to describe normal radio broadcasts which are free to listeners with conventional radio receivers. Soft news focuses on interesting individuals rather than on major events or developments which impact on lots of people. Subtitles for the deaf and hard-of-hearing are called closed captions. Media conference: Also called press conference or news conference. The distinctive font on the cover of the New York Times, for example, is immediately recognizable before one even reads the words, “New York Times” on the front page. 8 grammes per square metre. This includes an informed and critical understanding of the nature of the media, the techniques used by them and the impact of these techniques. Headline or head: A word or short phrase in large type at the top of an article designed to either summarise the news or grab the reader’s attention and make them want to read it.

Sometimes called fully justified or set full. Analogue television and analogue radio: The original method of transmitting television or radio signals using radio waves, increasingly being replaced by higher quality digital broadcasting (television and radio), transmitted in a digital data stream. 8 grammes per square metre. From a time when printing presses were stopped to put in urgent breaking news before continuing the print run. ArrayThe following glossary contains more than 500 definitions of terms about journalism and the media. Professional journalists are usually trained and receive payment for their work. Page views are a more reliable measure of web traffic. In television, information superimposed over a picture, usually at the top or bottom of the screen, describing what is being shown. Reviews are typically written of plays and other theatre performances, concerts and recitals, new recordings, movies, radio and television programs, books, restaurants, exhibitions and other forms of entertainment.

Headline or head: A word or short phrase in large type at the top of an article designed to either summarise the news or grab the reader’s attention and make them want to read it. Even experienced media teachers are often bewildered by the seemingly interchangeable terminology used by writers and speakers in the field. Also used to describe a newspaper style that uses short, simply-written stories and headlines with lots of pictures to illustrate more sensational content. EFP, EJ and ENG:  Electronic field production, electronic journalism and electronic news gathering. Digital radio broadcasting (DRB): Also called digital audio broadcasting (DAB), a method of transmitting radio signals in data streams giving a much higher quality than the old analogue system and allowing more programming channels within the same amount of spectrum. (1) The final words or pictures on a radio or TV report or interview, noted to the director or presenter so they know that segment is finished. Tabloid:  A small, compact format newspaper, usually less than 43 cm (17 inches) long. Also called supers because they are superimposed over the image of the person who is speaking or cap gens (cg) from creation by a caption generator.

Strapline: (1) In print and online, a kind of subhead or standfirst immediately following a larger headline.   Correct term is title piece.   Also called a flag Point
the standard unit of type size, 12 points to a pica, the basis of print measurement Process Colour
usually taken to mean full-colour reproduction achieved by colour separation on individual pieces of film Reverses
the typographical elements that reverse or vary the normal use of black lettering on paper, ie, white-on-black, black-on-tint, white-on-tint; often abbreviated to WOBs, BOTs, and WOTs ROP
run-of-paper, a term used to describe display advertising placed throughout the paper, as opposed to classified ads which appear in categorised sections, usually in the middle or back of a newspaper Scoop
also called an exclusive, a story obtained by a newspaper to the exclusion of its competitors Splash
the main story leading the front page of the paper Stand First
a kind of typographical aperitif, a sentence or two presented in display fashion to introduce a news story or feature and perhaps its writer Strap
subsidiary smaller headline placed over a main headline Streamer
the main heading on a page, running across several columns but less than the full width of a page. Type (2) is also called non-attributable information. Subhead
(or Crosshead), a sub-heading within the text of a story or article, often used to break columns of type and make the page more attractive or easy on the eye.

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Box an item or story ruled off on all four sides, usually with a. 8 grammes per square metre. Journalism and publishing terms list, print and online, collated by our community of journalists, bloggers, editors, sub-editors, designers, PRs and other. Similar to actuality in radio except the person can be seen. Freelance journalist (freelancer): Usually a reporter or editor not formally employed by any media organisation, instead working on projects under contract or paid individual amounts for work accepted for publication or broadcast.   It usually appears just under the headline  
Coloured dyes are used to make the paper the degree of white required – look closely and you can see that different whites are slightly green, blue, yellow or pink. Used by a journalist, they often prompt strong reactions from interviewees but this can obscure useful discussions and prompt accusations of bias. He said: ‘She gone [sic] to see her mother.   Also called a flag Point
the standard unit of type size, 12 points to a pica, the basis of print measurement Process Colour
usually taken to mean full-colour reproduction achieved by colour separation on individual pieces of film Reverses
the typographical elements that reverse or vary the normal use of black lettering on paper, ie, white-on-black, black-on-tint, white-on-tint; often abbreviated to WOBs, BOTs, and WOTs ROP
run-of-paper, a term used to describe display advertising placed throughout the paper, as opposed to classified ads which appear in categorised sections, usually in the middle or back of a newspaper Scoop
also called an exclusive, a story obtained by a newspaper to the exclusion of its competitors Splash
the main story leading the front page of the paper Stand First
a kind of typographical aperitif, a sentence or two presented in display fashion to introduce a news story or feature and perhaps its writer Strap
subsidiary smaller headline placed over a main headline Streamer
the main heading on a page, running across several columns but less than the full width of a page. Tagline: (1) Contact information for an article’s author, published to enable readers to provide feedback.

Also called a sub-editor. Unjustified text which aligns with the left margin but not with the right margin is said to be set left, flush left or ragged right. For example, playing video reports on Web pages or print journalists recording interviews for broadcast online. Sic: Latin for ‘thus’ or ‘so’, is usually written in square brackets as [sic] after an misused or misspelled word or phrase to show they have been reproduced exactly as spoken or written in the original, e. We usually give the most common form but where this is unclear we give alternatives. They ‘float’ over the presenter’s voice to illustrate aspects of what the presenter or guest is talking about.

When reporters are gathered together to question someone in the news, usually taking it in turns to ask questions. A story about world-wide freelance writing champion Brian Nelson, might have a jumpline saying, “See Nelson, Page A4,” for example. Teachers from elementary to high school use the newspaper as a tool for increasing test scores, improving reading comprehension skills, and helping students experience history as it happens. ABC: (1) Audit Bureaux of Circulations, industry-owned companies which audit (and verify) print media circulation figures. Any use is subject to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Over-dub: To dub sound on top of another sound, so the original sound can still be heard in the background. It occurs only on the front page of the newspaper, and is typically an important part of newspaper branding. Mediating between these are the individual processes of communication as well as the technological processes of the mass media. Used by a journalist, they often prompt strong reactions from interviewees but this can obscure useful discussions and prompt accusations of bias. 8 grammes per square metre. Tagline: (1) Contact information for an article’s author, published to enable readers to provide feedback. Chroma key: A process by which a person is filmed in front of a blank screen, onto which is then added still or moving pictures, often to make it appear they are at the scene. Reported speech: A way of reporting what someone has said without using their exact words in a quote. Longer features may be called documentaries. In some countries, limited radio services are also delivered via satellite.

He said: ‘She gone [sic] to see her mother.   Different newspaper printing presses use slightly different sizes, webs, or reels of paper Dateline
the line at the beginning of a news story that says where and when the story comes from Deadline
the time limit for preparing material for a certain edition Deck
a headline section, usually a line or a subsidiary headline Desktop Publishing (or DTP)
use of personal computers (PCs) for low-cost typesetting and page make-up using any of the industry accepted proprietary, off-the-shelf ‘shrink-wrapped’ or bespoke software packages Ear or Ear Piece
the small advertising space beside the paper’s titlepiece on the front page Edition
each issue of the paper (mainly national and regional daily titles) are usually published in several editions – both to cover different areas and to update the news Extra
an edition of a newspaper published at a time other than the usual scheduled ones Fount
pronounced ‘font’ – the complete set of type of one particular face and size, available from numerous type suppliers/manufacturers on computer disks Gutter
the space between columns and facing pages Layout
traditionally a ‘dummy’ plan of the page, a scheme or make-up sheet.             Beat Checks – Using a telephone to search for and tape news stories from a list of agencies. Delay: Equipment in a radio studio which stores seven seconds of program in memory before sending it to the transmitter. A magazine or newspaper, an advertisement. Usually used to put voice over background or wild sound or to put a translation in one language over the original words spoken in another language. Flash: (1) A brief news story which interrupts normal radio or television programming, usually to tell of a major breaking event. Not to be confused with advocacy journalism. Noddy: In television, a brief cut-away shot of a reporter or interviewer listening to an interviewee’s answer, often nodding his or her head. IDs are usually composed around specific melodies, themes or slogans and made available to presenters in a variety of styles and lengths to suit different purposes in programming. Free-to-air: Television broadcast on public spectrum which is free to viewers. An example would be coverage of a demonstration at City Hall where people are loudly protesting. Podcasting is an especially popular method of making radio and television programs available online after they have been broadcast, though some programs are now only produced for download. Even perceived conflicts of interest should be declared openly.

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Delay is used during phone-ins and talkback programs so if a caller says something that should not go on air (e. This technique is frequently overused, but when used properly it adds immeasurably to a story. Unjustified: Text in columns where the individual lines to not all align to the same left or right margin.             Wrap/live – basically the same as the wrap in that the information is collected and written the same. For example, playing video reports on Web pages or print journalists recording interviews for broadcast online.

Knowing some basic terminology can help publishers communicate effectively about newspaper page elements. Free-to-air: Television broadcast on public spectrum which is free to viewers.   A good beat check would be comprised of the sheriff’s offices, fire department, local police, state highway patrol, DNR , local hospitals, and other government agencies that routinely handle breaking stories.   Producers/editors should always estimate the running time of the newscast based on the actual time of each recorded  report and her or his best guess as to the time of each intro and each story to be read by the anchor. When actual reports are produced or live interviews are arranged, they are added to the line-up for the upcoming bulletin or newscast. Newspaper Page Elements Definitions Glossary.

(2) An abrupt ending. “Newspaper Jargon” booklet whose contents. Occasionally also used to describe normal radio broadcasts which are free to listeners with conventional radio receivers. There are currently two quality levels in television, standard definition (SDTV) and high definition (HDTV). Soft news focuses on interesting individuals rather than on major events or developments which impact on lots of people.             Package (PKG) – A report from a correspondent that contains a sound bite inserted between the introduction and the epilogue (usually inserted after the reporter’s second or third sentence). Also called greenscreen, bluescreen or Colour Separation Overlay (CSO).

The outcue for this is always “At (i. In television sometimes called sync. There are currently two quality levels in television, standard definition (SDTV) and high definition (HDTV). The best known newspaper element is the headline. Stet: Latin for ‘let it stand’, a mark – the word ‘stet’ in a circle – used by sub-editors and proof readers telling the typesetter to disregard a change that had been previously marked. Strapline: (1) In print and online, a kind of subhead or standfirst immediately following a larger headline.

Mediating between these are the individual processes of communication as well as the technological processes of the mass media

Media kit: (1) A set of materials provided to journalists by an organisation to promote their products or services. (2) Raw feed is this footage transmitted from location to the base studio or to other television stations, where it will be processed. Printed title of a newspaper on page one. Television news gathering which replaced film couriered back to the newsroom with electronic methods such as video and microwave links to the studio. Some broadcasters also use the term for an unheralded phone interview. (4) An ending that finishes a story or bulletin with a climax, surprise, or punch line (see also tailpiece).

Newspaper Page Elements Definitions Glossary

Mojo: Mobile journalists who use light and portable reporting and communications tools such as mobile camera phones, PDAs and notebook wireless computers to record, edit and transmit their work in text, audio, pictures and video while in the field, without using an office. The Times-News Newspaper in Education program provides print and electronic replica editions (e-editions) of the newspaper at a reduced rate for use in Alamance County (N. A newspaper format that’s roughly half the size of a broadsheet newspaper. Text which aligns with the right margin but not the left is said to be set right, flush right or ragged left. Soft news: Stories about topics which are interesting and new but which have little or no material effect on people’s lives. Once downloaded onto a computer, podcasts can be transferred to portable devices such as the Apple iPod or similar MP3 players.

Feature: A longer article or radio story, usually in greater depth and complexity than a simple news item. Used by a journalist, they often prompt strong reactions from interviewees but this can obscure useful discussions and prompt accusations of bias. It is usually funded by taxpayers (public broadcasting) or advertising (commercial broadcasting). Paper glossary helps define paper. Hits:  A popular but misleading method of counting viewing of websites.   A crosshead is centred in the column, a subhead usually set left. Stereotypes: A form of media representation by which instantly recognized characteristics are used to label members of social or cultural
groups.

To bring a story forward in a bulletin or earlier in a newspaper. Chroma key: A process by which a person is filmed in front of a blank screen, onto which is then added still or moving pictures, often to make it appear they are at the scene. Its grammage makes a huge difference in the cost of publication with many pages. Where there is only a single camera, noddies are usually shot after the interview ends and then edited into the finished piece to break up long slabs of the interviewee. See also stock footage. Analogue television and analogue radio: The original method of transmitting television or radio signals using radio waves, increasingly being replaced by higher quality digital broadcasting (television and radio), transmitted in a digital data stream.

(2) An abrupt ending

Similar to actuality in radio except the person can be seen. Tagline: (1) Contact information for an article’s author, published to enable readers to provide feedback. Or objective broadsheet newspaper.   It usually appears just under the headline  
Coloured dyes are used to make the paper the degree of white required – look closely and you can see that different whites are slightly green, blue, yellow or pink. Propaganda: Information presented intentionally to influence a mass audience to support or oppose something. A package will contain a written introduction for the newsreader, the reporter’s edited report complete with vision and sound and an out-cue for the end.

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