Newspaper terms glossary

(2) Information given to a journalist for use in a story on condition that the source will not be identified. Glossary of Newspaper Terms. A package will contain a written introduction for the newsreader, the reporter’s edited report complete with vision and sound and an out-cue for the end. See also stock footage. Video podcasts are often called vodcasts. Newspaper Terminology; NIE Teacher Services; Teacher’s Lesson Exchange; ORDER. Similar to actuality in radio except the person can be seen. Program idents give the program title and/or the presenter’s name. The following glossary contains more than 500 definitions of terms about journalism and the media.

Affiliate – A local station that subscribes to the services and programs of a network. Also called a kicker (see definition 4).   Popular national newspapers are tabloid in size White
generic term for space. These can be included in PKGs and VO/SOTs or can stand alone. (2) Two-way intercom equipment by which a radio or television presenter or newsreader in a studio can communicate with producers or directors in a control room. (2) In advertising, a slogan attached to a product brand name, e. (2) A short message from a news agency alerting subscribers to a major breaking event, about which they will shortly provide more detailed coverage.             Wrap/live – basically the same as the wrap in that the information is collected and written the same. Often used to name and describe the person speaking. Station ID (identification): Pre-recorded music and/or words used to identify an individual radio or television station. At the end of the SOT, the reporter or anchor resumes reading with or without additional video.

In television, information superimposed over a picture, usually at the top or bottom of the screen, describing what is being shown. Unjustified text which aligns with the left margin but not with the right margin is said to be set left, flush left or ragged right. Other users cannot see your My Notes. EFP, EJ and ENG:  Electronic field production, electronic journalism and electronic news gathering. Propaganda: Information presented intentionally to influence a mass audience to support or oppose something. Also called a cutline. Typically, whole programs are dedicated to this single function and the names of people who pledge money are read out on air. GLOSSARY OF MEDIA TERMS. Jump line: A line of type at the bottom of an incomplete newspaper or magazine article which directs the reader to another page where the story is continued. From the newspaper practice of highlighting an exclusive. Raw: In broadcast journalism, material before it has been processed, especially edited. Tabloid:  A small, compact format newspaper, usually less than 43 cm (17 inches) long. IDs are usually composed around specific melodies, themes or slogans and made available to presenters in a variety of styles and lengths to suit different purposes in programming. (3) Someone who prepares material for print or broadcast. Paper glossary helps define paper. Box an item or story ruled off on all four sides, usually with a.

Float: Pictures or vision shown on television while the presenter is talking or interviewing a guest. Affiliate – A local station that subscribes to the services and programs of a network. Sometimes called fully justified or set full.             Sound bite (SOT) – edited slice of a newsmaker speaking. Subhead
(or Crosshead), a sub-heading within the text of a story or article, often used to break columns of type and make the page more attractive or easy on the eye. Chroma key: A process by which a person is filmed in front of a blank screen, onto which is then added still or moving pictures, often to make it appear they are at the scene. Conflict of interest: When a journalist allows something with which he or she has a personal stake to interfere with their duty to be fair and objective in covering a story. Tagline: (1) Contact information for an article’s author, published to enable readers to provide feedback. Hits:  A popular but misleading method of counting viewing of websites. Human interest stories can also cover unusual and interesting aspects of other people’s lives which are not particularly significant to society as a whole.

Some broadcasters also use the term for an unheralded phone interview.             Feedback – An ear-splitting squeal or howl caused when sound from a loudspeaker is picked up by a microphone and reamplified. Yellowing is very evident in groundwood papers and only a few hours in direct sunlight is enough to. Sometimes called a sound bite. Journalism and publishing terms list, print and online, collated by our community of journalists, bloggers, editors, sub-editors, designers, PRs and other. ArrayFrom the newspaper practice of highlighting an exclusive. Its grammage makes a huge difference in the cost of publication with many pages. Glossary of business terms – A to Z Handy definitions of financial and economic jargon – from libor and quantitave easing to black swans and dead cat bounces. In reports from the field it is often the reporter’s sign-off name and location.

Actuality: In radio, the sound of something actually happening, people speaking etc. Sports editor, political editor etc.   Also called a flag Point
the standard unit of type size, 12 points to a pica, the basis of print measurement Process Colour
usually taken to mean full-colour reproduction achieved by colour separation on individual pieces of film Reverses
the typographical elements that reverse or vary the normal use of black lettering on paper, ie, white-on-black, black-on-tint, white-on-tint; often abbreviated to WOBs, BOTs, and WOTs ROP
run-of-paper, a term used to describe display advertising placed throughout the paper, as opposed to classified ads which appear in categorised sections, usually in the middle or back of a newspaper Scoop
also called an exclusive, a story obtained by a newspaper to the exclusion of its competitors Splash
the main story leading the front page of the paper Stand First
a kind of typographical aperitif, a sentence or two presented in display fashion to introduce a news story or feature and perhaps its writer Strap
subsidiary smaller headline placed over a main headline Streamer
the main heading on a page, running across several columns but less than the full width of a page. Usually used to put voice over background or wild sound or to put a translation in one language over the original words spoken in another language. Editorial: (1) An article written by, or on behalf of, an editor, giving the news organisation’s opinion on an issue. Chroma key: A process by which a person is filmed in front of a blank screen, onto which is then added still or moving pictures, often to make it appear they are at the scene. Advocacy journalism: A type of journalism in which journalists openly and intentionally takes sides on issues and express their opinions in reporting. Affiliate – A local station that subscribes to the services and programs of a network.

Hits:  A popular but misleading method of counting viewing of websites. Start studying Glossary of Newspaper Terms (part 2). Review: A description of an event with a critical assessment of how well it was done.   Popular national newspapers are tabloid in size White
generic term for space. Its grammage makes a huge difference in the cost of publication with many pages.

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The weight of newsprint is calculated in grammes per square metre, most of it weighing between 45 and 48. Can also mean specifically audio material recorded out of the studio on location, either voices or other sounds such as ambient noise. Often used to name and describe the person speaking. Objective journalism: A basic type of journalism practiced in democracies in which the journalists do not allow their personal biases to affect their work, they take a neutral stance even on difficult matters and give a fair representation of events and issues. Screen Name: This is the name that will appear next to any public Comments that you add to an item on the Viewer page. He said: ‘She gone [sic] to see her mother.             Voiceover-to-sound( VO/SOT) – A TV news story during which a news anchor or reporter reads a script live as video is played up to a place when a news maker video/audio sound bite is played. (2) In television news production, a list of the elements in a report, usually compiled as the material is filed. Journalist: Someone who finds and presents information as news to the audiences of newspapers, magazines, radio or television stations or the Internet. Affiliate – A local station that subscribes to the services and programs of a network.

EFP, EJ and ENG:  Electronic field production, electronic journalism and electronic news gathering. Also called a sub-editor. Compare with hard news. In reports from the field it is often the reporter’s sign-off name and location.   Different newspaper printing presses use slightly different sizes, webs, or reels of paper Dateline
the line at the beginning of a news story that says where and when the story comes from Deadline
the time limit for preparing material for a certain edition Deck
a headline section, usually a line or a subsidiary headline Desktop Publishing (or DTP)
use of personal computers (PCs) for low-cost typesetting and page make-up using any of the industry accepted proprietary, off-the-shelf ‘shrink-wrapped’ or bespoke software packages Ear or Ear Piece
the small advertising space beside the paper’s titlepiece on the front page Edition
each issue of the paper (mainly national and regional daily titles) are usually published in several editions – both to cover different areas and to update the news Extra
an edition of a newspaper published at a time other than the usual scheduled ones Fount
pronounced ‘font’ – the complete set of type of one particular face and size, available from numerous type suppliers/manufacturers on computer disks Gutter
the space between columns and facing pages Layout
traditionally a ‘dummy’ plan of the page, a scheme or make-up sheet. Podcast: Audio or video files that can be regularly or automatically downloaded from the website of their producer onto the computers of people who subscribe to receive them.

Journalists should check exactly which of these conditions the source expects. Also used to describe a newspaper style that uses short, simply-written stories and headlines with lots of pictures to illustrate more sensational content. Tailpiece or tail-piece: A surprising or humorous observation at the end of a story or bulletin, associated with the story or bulletin but standing apart from it because of its subject matter or tone. Noddy: In television, a brief cut-away shot of a reporter or interviewer listening to an interviewee’s answer, often nodding his or her head. Such gatherings are usually organised by an individual or company to deal with all the media in one session or to promote a new product or service. Newspaper Guild, an international. The following glossary contains more than 500 definitions. (2) Information on advertising and other service costs made available by media companies to potential advertisers. Also called a sub-editor. Closing headlines come at the end of a bulletin. In grammar, sometimes called indirect speech. Any use is subject to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. The relevant words are identified by underlining them with a dotted line. Newspaper Terminology; NIE Teacher Services; Teacher's Lesson Exchange; ORDER. Journalists traditionally work within a set of generally agreed societal principles or within professional codes.

Well-written reported speech allows a journalist to compress and explain a person’s words for greater efficiency and clarity. (3) An Australian name for talk radio. Cut-away or cutaway: A technique in television editing to break up a lengthy shot on one subject, to hide a join where footage has been cut or to make a transition between two scenes. (1) In broadcasting, a log (or logger) is a recording of everything which goes to air, kept for legal or regulatory purposes. Features may grow from a current news event or simply be examining a timeless issue. In printing, an illustration at the end of a chapter. Journalism, like any profession, has its own language and specialist words which practitioners need to know. Reviews are typically written of plays and other theatre performances, concerts and recitals, new recordings, movies, radio and television programs, books, restaurants, exhibitions and other forms of entertainment. A group that audits newspaper. Chroma key: A process by which a person is filmed in front of a blank screen, onto which is then added still or moving pictures, often to make it appear they are at the scene. Often used to name and describe the person speaking. DTV is higher quality than the old analogue TV. They ‘float’ over the presenter’s voice to illustrate aspects of what the presenter or guest is talking about. For instance, the sound of protesters is played underneath the reporter’s in-studio story concerning the opening of a nuclear plant.

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Journalism and publishing terms list, print and online, collated by our community of journalists, bloggers, editors, sub-editors, designers, PRs and other. Used by a journalist, they often prompt strong reactions from interviewees but this can obscure useful discussions and prompt accusations of bias. To bring a story forward in a bulletin or earlier in a newspaper. Float: Pictures or vision shown on television while the presenter is talking or interviewing a guest. The weight of newsprint is calculated in grammes per square metre, most of it weighing between 45 and 48.

Mainly used as a way of presenting dialogue from a foreign language as text in the language of broadcast. Broadcasting Terms close-up Shot of the face of the subject that dominated the frame so that little background is visible. Compare to professional journalists. In long interviews, the camera may ‘cut away’ to a shot of the interviewer (See noddy) then return to the interviewee. Unjustified text which aligns with the left margin but not with the right margin is said to be set left, flush left or ragged right. (4) An ending that finishes a story or bulletin with a climax, surprise, or punch line (see also tailpiece).

Hits counts the number of downloads of every element of a web page, not the page as a whole. There are currently two quality levels in television, standard definition (SDTV) and high definition (HDTV). This technique is frequently overused, but when used properly it adds immeasurably to a story. For example, having shares in a company could make a finance reporter say uncritically good things to boost that company. Cut-away or cutaway: A technique in television editing to break up a lengthy shot on one subject, to hide a join where footage has been cut or to make a transition between two scenes.             Sound bite (SOT) – edited slice of a newsmaker speaking. Features which are not strongly connected to hard news events are often called soft features.

However, if the reporter is also working as an anchor that week in the lab, only the sound-bites are recorded and replayed during the newscast while the anchor/reporter reads his/her script live. Unjustified: Text in columns where the individual lines to not all align to the same left or right margin. (2) Information given to a journalist for use in a story on condition that the source will not be identified. Screen Name: This is the name that will appear next to any public Comments that you add to an item on the Viewer page.

Banner
a large type headline running across a newspaper page Box
an item or story ruled off on all four sides, usually with a heavy border rule and often with the background tinted with the text in bold to highlight the story Broadsheet
a page size usually double that of a tabloid. (2) A person in charge of a special section of news output, e.

Justification: Where each line in a column of text aligns to the same left and right margins

In long interviews, the camera may ‘cut away’ to a shot of the interviewer (See noddy) then return to the interviewee. A newspaper format that’s roughly half the size of a broadsheet newspaper.   Popular national newspapers are tabloid in size White
generic term for space. (3) An Australian name for talk radio. Human interest stories are often used to make ideas more real and concrete in the minds of the viewer, reader or listener. You will be prompted to create your own Screen Name when you first add a Comment.

Features which are not strongly connected to hard news events are often called soft features

Screen Name: This is the name that will appear next to any public Comments that you add to an item on the Viewer page. Sometimes called a sound bite. Paper glossary helps define paper. Also used to describe unusual methods which actually do not look like advertising to the consumer. (2) Two-way intercom equipment by which a radio or television presenter or newsreader in a studio can communicate with producers or directors in a control room. Special radio receivers are required.

To bring a story forward in a bulletin or earlier in a newspaper. ‘Terrorist’ and ‘lazy’ used in some contexts could be examples of loaded words. Some broadcasters also use the term for an unheralded phone interview. Chroma key: A process by which a person is filmed in front of a blank screen, onto which is then added still or moving pictures, often to make it appear they are at the scene. (2) An adjective describing issues relating to news content as opposed to advertising or other non-news aspects of a newspaper or magazine. Sometimes called a sound bite.   See also Banner Subhead
(or Crosshead), a sub-heading within the text of a story or article, often used to break columns of type and make the page more attractive or easy on the eye.

City Hall)   , I’M LENA SMITH FOR THE NEWS AT FIVE-FIFTY,” in that order. 8 grammes per square metre. 9/8/2012 · A-Level English Glossary 1.   Quality national newspapers are broadsheet in size By-Line
the name of the writer. Subtitles for the deaf and hard-of-hearing are called closed captions. The tagline for the movie Jaws was ‘Just when you thought it was safe to go back in the water’.

Used in quotes to denote the words between them have been modified from or added to the original, usually for greater clarity, e

Can also mean specifically audio material recorded out of the studio on location, either voices or other sounds such as ambient noise. Advocacy journalism: A type of journalism in which journalists openly and intentionally takes sides on issues and express their opinions in reporting. Human interest stories are often used to make ideas more real and concrete in the minds of the viewer, reader or listener. Tabloid:  A small, compact format newspaper, usually less than 43 cm (17 inches) long. In television sometimes called sync. Screen Name: This is the name that will appear next to any public Comments that you add to an item on the Viewer page.

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