Glossary newspaper terms

In US called a tagline. Sports editor, political editor etc.   See also Banner Subhead
(or Crosshead), a sub-heading within the text of a story or article, often used to break columns of type and make the page more attractive or easy on the eye. Affiliate – A local station that subscribes to the services and programs of a network. Affiliate – A local station that subscribes to the services and programs of a network.

Caption
the descriptive line or lines accompanying an illustration or photograph Copy
traditionally the manuscript prepared for typesetting, but in the age of desk top publishing systems, the story or text on a wordprocessing screen ready for placing on the newspaper page Crosshead
see subhead Cut-off
the full column depth of a page, including the margins. From the newspaper practice of highlighting an exclusive. Yellowing is very evident in groundwood papers and only a few hours in direct sunlight is enough to. It may contain written documents, photographs, charts, schedules and other information the organisation wants journalists to focus on.

He said: ‘She gone [sic] to see her mother. First compiled at the start of the newsroom’s day, items may be added or taken away during the day. Special television sets are required to receive and display it.   Popular national newspapers are tabloid in size White
generic term for space. Digital broadcasting: An advanced system of broadcasting radio (DAB or DRB) or television (DTV) in digital pulses rather than waves and which gives improved quality and/or more channels of content. RSS: Rich Site Summary (also called Really Simple Syndication) are formats for delivering regularly updated web content provided by news sites, blogs, audio, video and other online publishers. Soft news focuses on interesting individuals rather than on major events or developments which impact on lots of people. The following glossary contains more than 500 definitions of terms about journalism and the media. Any use is subject to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Also called a sub-editor. For example, playing video reports on Web pages or print journalists recording interviews for broadcast online.

Sports editor, political editor etc.   Popular national newspapers are tabloid in size White
generic term for space. Human interest stories are often used to make ideas more real and concrete in the minds of the viewer, reader or listener. Editorial: (1) An article written by, or on behalf of, an editor, giving the news organisation’s opinion on an issue. Compare with advocacy journalism. Objective journalism: A basic type of journalism practiced in democracies in which the journalists do not allow their personal biases to affect their work, they take a neutral stance even on difficult matters and give a fair representation of events and issues. Agate : Small type. 9/8/2012 · A-Level English Glossary 1. Compare with terrestrial television and cable T. Journalism and publishing terms list, print and online, collated by our community of journalists, bloggers, editors, sub-editors, designers, PRs and other. Tabloid:  A small, compact format newspaper, usually less than 43 cm (17 inches) long. Sometimes called a sound bite. Podcast: Audio or video files that can be regularly or automatically downloaded from the website of their producer onto the computers of people who subscribe to receive them. Over-dub: To dub sound on top of another sound, so the original sound can still be heard in the background. In long interviews, the camera may ‘cut away’ to a shot of the interviewer (See noddy) then return to the interviewee. Noddy: In television, a brief cut-away shot of a reporter or interviewer listening to an interviewee’s answer, often nodding his or her head.

A book, an issue of a magazine or newspaper, an advertisement, an. Advocacy journalism: A type of journalism in which journalists openly and intentionally takes sides on issues and express their opinions in reporting.   Substantial savings can be made on handling, storage and distribution as well as original paper costs by using a lighter weight and of course lighter weights require less raw materials. Typically, whole programs are dedicated to this single function and the names of people who pledge money are read out on air. The Times-News Newspaper in Education program provides print and electronic replica. Features which are not strongly connected to hard news events are often called soft features. Journalists should check exactly which of these conditions the source expects.   The non-printing portion of a page Widow
a lonely word making up the last line of a paragraph, to be avoided when it would fall at the top of a second or subsequent leg or column of type . Soft news focuses on interesting individuals rather than on major events or developments which impact on lots of people. Similar to a shotlist.

Box an item or story ruled off on all four sides, usually with a. This glossary of newspaper terms was developed to increase the understanding of the terms and acronyms that may be unique to the newspaper industry. Also used to describe unusual methods which actually do not look like advertising to the consumer. Also an article that appears regularly in the newspaper (eg.   Substantial savings can be made on handling, storage and distribution as well as original paper costs by using a lighter weight and of course lighter weights require less raw materials. Package: A completed television news story pre-prepared for a news bulletin and ready for transmission. Journalism, like any profession, has its own language and specialist words which practitioners need to know. (3) Someone who prepares material for print or broadcast. Used by a journalist, they often prompt strong reactions from interviewees but this can obscure useful discussions and prompt accusations of bias.

Banner a large type headline running across a newspaper page. (2) Two-way intercom equipment by which a radio or television presenter or newsreader in a studio can communicate with producers or directors in a control room. Also called greenscreen, bluescreen or Colour Separation Overlay (CSO). Video podcasts are often called vodcasts. Headline or head: A word or short phrase in large type at the top of an article designed to either summarise the news or grab the reader’s attention and make them want to read it. Package: A completed television news story pre-prepared for a news bulletin and ready for transmission. Raw: In broadcast journalism, material before it has been processed, especially edited. Longer features may be called documentaries.

(2) Information given to a journalist for use in a story on condition that the source will not be identified. See also stock footage. Also called participatory journalism and networked journalism. A newspaper format that’s roughly half the size of a broadsheet newspaper. (2) Two-way intercom equipment by which a radio or television presenter or newsreader in a studio can communicate with producers or directors in a control room.

The main thing about the glossary newspaper terms

This glossary is designed to give you technical terms to help you write in more detail about media texts.   See also Banner Subhead
(or Crosshead), a sub-heading within the text of a story or article, often used to break columns of type and make the page more attractive or easy on the eye. Paper glossary helps define paper. Affiliate – A local station that subscribes to the services and programs of a network. In radio, features usually have a mixture of elements, including the reporter’s voice, interviews and other sounds. Also called an outcue. Reported speech: A way of reporting what someone has said without using their exact words in a quote. Glossary of Paper Terms. (3) An abbreviation of out-take, see below. There are many elements to a newspaper page, and not every element exists on every page.

8 grammes per square metre. Freelance journalist (freelancer): Usually a reporter or editor not formally employed by any media organisation, instead working on projects under contract or paid individual amounts for work accepted for publication or broadcast. Feature: A longer article or radio story, usually in greater depth and complexity than a simple news item. Citizen journalism: Journalism outside the established media, usually by ordinary citizens without professional training or organisational experience. In television, information superimposed over a picture, usually at the top or bottom of the screen, describing what is being shown. Unjustified: Text in columns where the individual lines to not all align to the same left or right margin.

A station ident may contain the station’s name and frequency, often accompanied by a musical jingle. Glossary of Broadcasting/Broadcast News Terms. See also background above. Glossary of Paper Terms. In grammar, sometimes called indirect speech. Cut-away or cutaway: A technique in television editing to break up a lengthy shot on one subject, to hide a join where footage has been cut or to make a transition between two scenes. Sometimes called fully justified or set full. Some broadcasters also use the term for an unheralded phone interview. Also called a cutline. In television, information superimposed over a picture, usually at the top or bottom of the screen, describing what is being shown. The tagline for the movie Jaws was ‘Just when you thought it was safe to go back in the water’. The following glossary contains more than 500 definitions. Paper glossary helps define paper. (2) Raw feed is this footage transmitted from location to the base studio or to other television stations, where it will be processed. Strapline: (1) In print and online, a kind of subhead or standfirst immediately following a larger headline.

Tape editing used to be a linear process of dubbing individual shots from a source tape onto an edit master in sequence. The following glossary contains more than 500 definitions of terms about journalism and the media. Agate : Small type. Compare with hard news. Convergence: The bringing together of different media technologies such as radio, print, video and the Internet so they work together to improve communications. News in brief (NIB): Also punctuated as news-in-brief, a collection of short stories or a single story presented in one or two short paragraphs. Yellowing is very evident in groundwood papers and only a few hours in direct sunlight is enough to. For example, playing video reports on Web pages or print journalists recording interviews for broadcast online. The weight of newsprint is calculated in grammes per square metre, most of it weighing between 45 and 48. Banner a large type headline running across a newspaper page. Sometimes called a sound bite. This page is intended to be a glossary of old and new media terms of relevance to. Even perceived conflicts of interest should be declared openly. (2) A short message from a news agency alerting subscribers to a major breaking event, about which they will shortly provide more detailed coverage.

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A newspaper format that’s roughly half the size of a broadsheet newspaper. Also the line at the top of the continued article stating the page from which it was continued, also called a ‘from’ line. Program idents give the program title and/or the presenter’s name. DTV is higher quality than the old analogue TV. Sports editor, political editor etc.

  Substantial savings can be made on handling, storage and distribution as well as original paper costs by using a lighter weight and of course lighter weights require less raw materials. Features which are not strongly connected to hard news events are often called soft features.   Different newspaper printing presses use slightly different sizes, webs, or reels of paper Dateline
the line at the beginning of a news story that says where and when the story comes from Deadline
the time limit for preparing material for a certain edition Deck
a headline section, usually a line or a subsidiary headline Desktop Publishing (or DTP)
use of personal computers (PCs) for low-cost typesetting and page make-up using any of the industry accepted proprietary, off-the-shelf ‘shrink-wrapped’ or bespoke software packages Ear or Ear Piece
the small advertising space beside the paper’s titlepiece on the front page Edition
each issue of the paper (mainly national and regional daily titles) are usually published in several editions – both to cover different areas and to update the news Extra
an edition of a newspaper published at a time other than the usual scheduled ones Fount
pronounced ‘font’ – the complete set of type of one particular face and size, available from numerous type suppliers/manufacturers on computer disks Gutter
the space between columns and facing pages Layout
traditionally a ‘dummy’ plan of the page, a scheme or make-up sheet. A page with 30 text boxes, images, menus and other graphics will count as 30 hits. Advocacy journalism: A type of journalism in which journalists openly and intentionally takes sides on issues and express their opinions in reporting. Paper glossary helps define paper.

(1) In broadcasting, a log (or logger) is a recording of everything which goes to air, kept for legal or regulatory purposes. Jump line: A line of type at the bottom of an incomplete newspaper or magazine article which directs the reader to another page where the story is continued. Square brackets: Also called ‘box brackets’. First compiled at the start of the newsroom’s day, items may be added or taken away during the day. Podcasting is an especially popular method of making radio and television programs available online after they have been broadcast, though some programs are now only produced for download.   See also Banner Subhead
(or Crosshead), a sub-heading within the text of a story or article, often used to break columns of type and make the page more attractive or easy on the eye. Feature: A longer article or radio story, usually in greater depth and complexity than a simple news item.

Yellowing is very evident in groundwood papers and only a few hours in direct sunlight is enough to. Its grammage makes a huge difference in the cost of publication with many pages. Off the record: (1) Information given to a journalist as background on condition that it will not be used in a story. It attempts to be factually based and is not to be confused with badly-practised objective journalism or propaganda. Float: Pictures or vision shown on television while the presenter is talking or interviewing a guest. A station ident may contain the station’s name and frequency, often accompanied by a musical jingle.

Teachers from elementary to high school use the newspaper as a tool for increasing test scores, improving reading comprehension skills, and helping students experience history as it happens

A page with 30 text boxes, images, menus and other graphics will count as 30 hits. This glossary of newspaper terms was developed to increase the understanding of the terms and acronyms that may be unique to the newspaper industry. Paper glossary helps define paper.   Correct term is title piece. Compare with advocacy journalism. The Prime Minister said: ‘We will not tolerate weapons [from Russia] to cross our borders.

He said: ‘She gone [sic] to see her mother

Advocacy journalism: A type of journalism in which journalists openly and intentionally takes sides on issues and express their opinions in reporting. Special radio receivers are required.   Popular national newspapers are tabloid in size White
generic term for space. 9/8/2012 · A-Level English Glossary 1. Compare to professional journalists.   See also Banner Subhead
(or Crosshead), a sub-heading within the text of a story or article, often used to break columns of type and make the page more attractive or easy on the eye.

Closing headlines come at the end of a bulletin. Editor: (1) The person – usually a journalist – in charge of the editorial content and direction of a newspaper, magazine or other news outlet. Newspaper Guild, an international. When actual reports are produced or live interviews are arranged, they are added to the line-up for the upcoming bulletin or newscast. Newspaper Terminology; NIE Teacher Services; Teacher’s Lesson Exchange; ORDER. Glossary of Paper Terms. Newspaper Page Elements Definitions Glossary.

Also used to describe unusual methods which actually do not look like advertising to the consumer. Also an article that appears regularly in the newspaper (eg. For example, playing video reports on Web pages or print journalists recording interviews for broadcast online. The Prime Minister said: ‘We will not tolerate weapons [from Russia] to cross our borders. Used by a journalist, they often prompt strong reactions from interviewees but this can obscure useful discussions and prompt accusations of bias. Caption: In print, short pieces of text placed below or beside pictures to describe them and identify the photographers and/or owners.

Propaganda: Information presented intentionally to influence a mass audience to support or oppose something

Affiliate – A local station that subscribes to the services and programs of a network. Raw: In broadcast journalism, material before it has been processed, especially edited. Glossary of Paper Terms. Conflicts of interest can be real or perceived.   Substantial savings can be made on handling, storage and distribution as well as original paper costs by using a lighter weight and of course lighter weights require less raw materials. Box an item or story ruled off on all four sides, usually with a.

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